Gallery

Joos van Craesbeeck

Joos van Craesbeeck
Neerlinter 1605/1606 – 1660 Brussel
Head of a yelling peasant

Oil on copper:
13.3 x 10.3 cm (oval)
Inscription: Etatis, 27, 1655

Provenance: Sale Amsterdam (Sotheby’s), 5 May 2009, lot 70 (as Haarlem School, Seventeenth century)

Literature: Joos van Craesbeeck (1605/06-ca.1660). Een Brabants genreschilder (Pictura Nova XI), Turnhout, 2006.

This small tronie on copper shows the head of a coarse man pulling faces. He is depicted in profile against a loam colored background, his expressive face turned towards the viewer. He is wearing an olive green jacket finished with a white collar. His matching and plumed hat partially covers his half-long tousled and curly hair.

The 2009 auction catalogue of Sotheby’s stipulated that “clearly made under the influence of Adriaen Brouwer, this small tronie was probably painted by a Haarlem master from the circle of Judith Leyster, Jan Miense Molenaer and Pieter Quast.” The indebtedness of this crude head to Adriaen Brouwer (ca 1605-1638) is obvious. However, its author is to be found in Brouwer’s Flemish instead of in his Dutch sphere of influence. The most plausible candidate is Joos van Craesbeeck (1605/06-ca 1660). Of Hageland origin – a rural region situated to the east west of Antwerp -, Van Craesbeeck settled successively in Antwerp and Brussels. He entered professional life as a baker, after that combined the jobs of baker and painter, and finally devoted himself to the painter’s trade exclusively. In 1633-34 he was registered as a master in the Antwerp guild of Saint Luke and hereby listed as a painter but still as a baker too. In 1651 he was recorded in the Brussels guild, now as a painter only. In the court-capital Van Craesbeeck further developed his artistic talents, built up a studio and listed two pupils: Adriaen Rombouts in 1652 and, approximately one year later, Lucas Viters. After a stirring life, he finally died around 1660.

Although not officially registered, artistic characteristics and literary sources indicate that Van Craesbeeck was Brouwer’s pupil. Especially in his early works he proves himself a true Brouwer epigone, on a stylistic as well as on a technical and iconographic level. To those typical Brouwer works belongs a group of expressive heads showing vehement emotions to which the painting under consideration can be counted. The picture with the yelling man bears a strong resemblance to Brouwer’s famous Bitter Draught in the Städel in Frankfurt. A lot of copies exist from this authentic painting. Most of them are rather literal. Van Craesbeeck’s work by contrast stands out for being a creative variant of the original. 

As in many a copy by Van Craesbeeck after Brouwer here too changes have been introduced to the attributes and the headgear: the drinking-bowl and the bottle from the original have been omitted and the head covering of the man has been transformed from a low beret into a characteristic Van Craesbeeck hat with feather. Moreover, the man’s position has been altered from a slightly turned, to a side-view perspective. Brouwer’s Bitter Draught should have been created in the last years of his career, around 1636-38. This date is guiding for Van Craesbeeck’s variant here discussed, which, as a consequence, can be situated at the end of the thirties.

Stylistically it resembles Van Craesbeeck’s Head of a peasant with felt hat in Berlin (De Clippel 2006, cat. A12) and his Man eating porridge (De Clippel 2006, cat. A15). In comparison with the latter, it displays the same little hairs on the skin, the same curly and smoothly painted head of hair, the same red nose and, finally, the same look with one eye open and another nearly closed. Unique however, is the copper support which cannot be found elsewhere in Van Craesbeeck’s oeuvre.

Karolien De Clippel

 

Jan Weenix

Jan Weenix
1640/42 - Amsterdam - 1719
Study of a Dutch decoy dog
"Kooikerhondje"

Oil on  panel:
20,5 X 22 cm
Inscription: Etatis, 27, 1655

Provenance:
Private collection

Jan Weenix was the son and student of his father Jan Baptist Weenix. He studied together with his cousin Melchior d´Hondecoeter in his fathers´ atelier. The family moved in1657 to a small castle in Vleuten near Utrecht. Jan Weenix started his career with Italianate landscapes and genre scenes which strongly recall the influence of his father. From 1664 until 1668 he was recorded in the Utrecht painters´ guild. From then onwards he lived in his hometown Amsterdam where he became one of the most influential game piece-painters of the late seventeenth century.

This beautiful small study of a decoy dog was useful for his game pieces, hunting scenes and genre pictures in which they occur often. It was probably made in the beginning of his career since it occurs in several pictures from the early 1660´s.  It is seen in The young shepherds´ couple from 1662 (art-market) or in The landscape with a shepherd Boy in Dulwich from 1664. Jan Baptist made a large canvas with a decoy dog (formerly collection Nystad).

The lively painted happy looking dog stands firm in this picture his coat is painted so precise that almost every hair can be seen. The golden bell under his neck shows that it’s a domestic pet. It probably belonged to Weenix since his perfect depiction of the dog only could be reached after thorough study of the animal.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was impressed by the treatment of animals in Weenix pictures which he saw in Munich. He devoted a poem to the masters technique in which he stated that Weenix equaled and even surpassed nature in his treatment of animal textures as hair, feathers and claws.     

The decoy dog was a a beloved domestic pet. It is pictured in numerous Dutch seventeenth century pictures. Especially Jan Steen used a decoy dog in many of his genre pictures. The popularity in Holland of this dog may well be derived from the legend that William the silent was rescued by such a Dog. His grave monument in the Church of Delft depicts a dog resting at his feet. 

This picture will be included in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné by Anke van Wagenberg on the Weenix Family.

Karel de Moor

Karel de Moor, Leiden 1655- 1738 Warmond
"Smoking man at a table"
Oil on panel: 
20 x 17,5 cm

Provenance:
Bonhams Knightbridge, 2007
Private collection, London

The painter Carel de Moor was acquainted with Arnold Houbraken who tells us that he learned painting with Gerard Dou. Afterwards he also took lessons with Abraham van den Tempel and Godfried Schalcken The latter surprises Houbraken since this author regarded Carel Moor higher than the portrait painter Schalcken. 
In 1683 De Moor became member of St. Luke ‘s guild in Leiden. He was between 1688 and 1711 several times chairman of the guild.
He received an important commission for a painting in the City Hall of Leiden.
Carel the Moor was a successful portrait-painter who received a golden medal from the Duke of Tuscany for a portrait. He was knighted by Price Eugene of Savoy for another portrait and ever since known as Knight De Moor. De Moor died as a wealthy man in 1738.
His finished style resembles that of his teachers and forerunners as Dou and especially Frans van Mieris. De Moor belongs to the same school of ‘Leiden Fijnschilders’ 

The subject of a smoking man is often depicted in Dutch art. The Leiden painters even depicted themselves smoking in self-portraits.  See for example the self-portrait of Jan van Mieris in the Hamburger Kunsthalle.
At the beginning of the seventeenth century smoking was a novelty. Only drunk peasants were painted smoking. But towards the end of the century smoking was accepted in higher classes. A long famous earthenware Gouda pipe was regarded as a status-symbol.
Smoking, not different from nowadays was often combined with drinking as is seen in this picture. On the table next to the wine-jug is a pewter beaker. The wealthy man in his rich clothes sits relaxed in his chair.

The slight resemblance in face with the self-portrait of 1703 in the Leiden Lakenhal Museum does not implicate that this specific portrait is a self-portrait.  As for example Frans van Mieris  and Jan Steen used their own face in several genre pictures it is possible that Carel de Moor worked in the same way. The own face was always available as model.

Ilse Tijhuis Peterson

Ilse Tijhuis Peterson
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Parker

Ilse Tijhuis Parker
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Mcferrin

Ilse Tijhuis Mcferrin
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Marsalis

Ilse Tijhuis Marsalis
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijshuis Benson

Ilse Tijshuis Benson
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Simone

Ilse Tijhuis Simone
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Fitzgerald

Ilse Tijhuis Fitzgerald
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Davis

Ilse Tijhuis Davis
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Burke

Ilse Tijhuis Burke
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Amstrong

Ilse Tijhuis Amstrong
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Dutch school

Dutch school
17th century
“Portrait of a Man”
Oil on copper:
16,7  x  13,2 cm
Inscription: Etatis, 27, 1655

Ilse Tijhuis Sophia Loren

Ilse Tijhuis Sophia Loren
Oil on canvas
120 x 100cm
Signed

Ilse Tijhuis Faith

Ilse Tijhuis Faith
Oil on canvas
160 x 120cm
Signed

Painting 5

Painting 5
135 X 135 cm

Painting 4

Painting 4
120 X 120 cm

Painting 3

Painting 3
120 X 120 cm

Painting 8

Painting 8
135 X 135 cm

Patty Schilder - Terusan

Patty Schilder
Terusan
47 X 80 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Patty Schilder - Shield

Patty Schilder
Shield
40 X 80 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Patty Schilder - Schild

Patty Schilder
Schild
33 X 80 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Patty Schilder - Guardian Angel

Patty Schilder
Guardian Angel
30 X 75 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Patty Schilder - Graffiti

Patty Schilder
Graffiti
80 X 40 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Patty Schilder - Eureka

Patty Schilder
Eureka
72 X 30 cm
Stone ware
Signed

Walking Lady

Pauline Bakker
One Way
80 X 60 cm
Acrylic on canvas
Signed

Kiosk

Pauline Bakker
Kiosk
80 X 100 cm
Acrylic on canvas

English Shore

Pauline Bakker
English Shore
50 X 100 cm
Acrylic on canvas

American Shore

Pauline Bakker
American Shore
80 X 100 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Power of Nature

Amber Bijl
Power of Nature
2,00 X 2,00 m
Figleaf, wood and metal

Vanishing Point

Amber Bijl
Vanishing Point
1,20 m (Diameter)
Maple seeds

Spatial drawing of Lines and dots

Amber Bijl
Spatial drawing of Lines and dots
3,00 X 2,00 m
Alder and hardboard

Weightless

Amber Bijl
Weightless
2,80 X 1,20 X 1,00 m
Honesty (=Judaspenning), thread and cardboard,

Charles Lapostolet

Charles Lapostolet
Vélars 1824 - 1890 Domène
“Harbour scene”

Oil on panel
31.8 X 40.6 cm
Signed: C. Lapostolet

Charles Lapostolet

Charles Lapostolet
Vélars 1824 - 1890 Domène
“Harbour scene”

Oil on panel
31.8 X 40.6 cm
Signed: C. Lapostolet

Pieter Bout

Pieter Bout
1658 – Brussel – 1719
“A pleasant gathering at a market scene”                              

Oil on panel
20 x 29 cm
Signed

Francois Wauters

Francois Wauters
Lierse 1612 - 1659 Anwerpen
“Landscape with a wagon”
Oil on panel
43 X 62 cm

Jan Steen

Jan Steen
1626 – Leiden – 1679
“A peasant wedding in a villagee”
Oil on paper on canvas
30,5  X  41 cm

 A unique oil sketch by Jan Steen

In the more recent literature about Jan Steen, the here presented oil sketch has been almost neglected. It has been accepted as a sketch by Wilhelm Martin in 1928, and by Karel Braun in his Alle schilderijen van Jan Steen of 1980. A carefull study of how the sketch is situated between the different versions of The Village Wedding, shows that Steen here prepared his ideas for at least two compositions. Recent insights about the Steen’s working methods is suggesting that the artist used an underdrawing  which is quite similar to this oil sketch. In the complicated story of Steen’s use of motives, sometimes in mirror image, the present sketch offers a hint of how the artist prepared and preserved his ideas. As very little is known about Jan Steen as a draughtsman (only two drawings can be related to his paintings), the sketch should be regarded as a unique evidence of the artist at work.


lit.:
Wilhelm Martin, ‘Neues über Jan Steen’,  in Zeitschrift für bildende Kunst 61(1927/28) pp. 330-334, ill. on p. 330.
Karel Braun, Alle tot nu toe bekende schilderijen van Jan Steen, Rotterdam 1980, nr. 40.

Leonard Bramer

Leonard Bramer
1596 – Delft - 1674
“Sheppard’s at a campfire”
Oil on slate
11 X 16,5 cm

Leonard Bramer
Delft 1596 – 1674 Delft

Standing figures around a fire
Oil ons late, 10,8 X 16,6 cm


Provenance
Private collection Germany

A Dutch painter and draughtsman, the first documentation of Bramer’s career records his travels through France and Italy, which he began in 1614. It is believed that he was a pupil of Adriaen van de Venne, although there is no documentation to support this. He has also been erroneously described as a follower of Rembrandt. The 17th-century biographer, De Bie, stated that Bramer visited Venice, Florence, Mantua, Siena, Bologna, Napels and Padoua, and lived in Roma from 1619 to 1625, before returning to Delft in 1628. It was in Rome that Bramer was influenced by the Caravaggesque painters, particularly Adam Elsheimer. He executed many nightpieces with dramatic chiaroscuro earning him the nickname ‘Leonardo delle Notti’. In Rome, Bramer was among the earliest members of the Schildersbent, a company of Dutch artists formed in Rome in the early 1620s. after his return to Delft, Bramer became a member of the Guild of the St Luke in 1629 and received important commissions from Stadholder Frederick Henrick and his nephew, Prince John Maurice of Nassau-Siegen for the palaces in the Hague (now the Mauritshuis), Rijswijk and Honselaarsdijk. He is not known to have had pupils, although Adriaen Verdoel and Johannes Vermeer may have studied with him.

Most of Bramer’s works feature many small figures set among antique buildings, ruins or in thick dark woods. His choice of mythological, allegorical, historical or biblical subjects reflects his preoccupation with Italian rather than popular Dutch subjects like landscapes, still-lifes, portraits and genre pieces. Bramer was also an extraordinary prolific draughtsman. Most of his drawings are independent works of art, and many of them form large cycles illustrating a particular book, like a story from the bible, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Virgil or the picaresque novel Lazarillo de Tormes. He began work on those series of drawings inspired by classical and modern literature in the mid-1640s. During Bramer’s lifetime there appears to have been considerable demand for his sequential drawings.

A number of similar small-size paintings on slate by the artist exist, such as the ‘Landscape with Shepherds’ (private collection, Milwaukee) and ‘Herdsmen near a campfire’ (formerly art market, Vienna and New York) (cf. J. Ten Brink Goldsmith, e.a. Leonart Bramer 1596-1674, Ingenious Painter and Draftsman in Rome and Delft (exhib.cat.), 1994,p. 97, ill. 13 and 13a).

 

Abraham de Pape

Abraham de Pape
1620 – Leiden – 1666
“Joseph telling his dreams”
Oil on panel
53 x 43 cm
Signed

Jacob Jordaens

Jacob Jordaens
1593 – Antwerp – 1678
“Study of two men”
Oil on paper laid down on panel
36 X 39 cm

Jacob Jordaens
1593 - Antwerp - 1678

Study of Two Men


Oil on paper, laid down on panel: 14 1/4 x 15 1/2 inches
                                          36.2 x 39.4 cm

Provenance:
Private collection, Milwaukee

Two men lean on a balustrade while slightly bending over to each other to look at something that has attracted their attention. The candle that illuminates the otherwise shaded face of the younger protagonist suggests that the scene takes place at night. However, a second source, casts light on the right half of the other man’s head, must be interpreted as daylight. This apparent incoherence certainly leaves room for the possibility that the figures were either conceived independently or could be used as a model for official works independently.  Being a sketch, the work strikes us for a number of reasons. Oil sketches by Rubens, Van Dyck and other examples by Jordaens often show one figure seen from different angles. The present work is not a mere figure study. We see Jordaens engaged in the study of various effects of light. The sharply lit man on the left shows influence of Caravaggio’s chiaroscuro, while the dimly lit face of the youngster may be considered to have his roots in the Venetian art and more specifically calls to mind the treating of light by Jacopo Tintoretto. The present oil sketch is datable to around 1616 and thus constitutes a very early endeavour to master the latest fashions and developments from Italy. Jordaens used a heavily loaded brush to apply the paint with short, powerful strokes that lends the sketch its immediacy.

Jacob Jordaens was the son of a wealthy cloth merchant. At the age of 14 he was apprentice to the Antwerp painter Adam van Noort. Unlike most of his contemporaries Jordaens never visited Italy but remained in his native town Antwerp for his entire life. In 1615 Jordaens was inscribed in the Antwerp Guild of St. Luke. He was only mentioned as a painter of watercolours on canvas or paper because he was initially a designer of tapestries. The year thereafter he married the daughter of his former teacher, Catharina van Noort. From 1616 he is documented as a painter in oil and to which became his main medium. In the 1620s Jordaens built a flourishing studio while also frequently assisting Rubens. He quickly developed himself as a versatile and prolific artist. A masterful technician, Jordaens’s enormous output includes altarpieces, mythological scenes, popular genre subjects and portraits. In addition he was a highly industrious draughtsman. His early success is also testified by his appointment as dean of the St. Luke Guild in 1621, at the age of 28. Further evidence of his blooming career may be found in the numerous commissions that he received, mainly from church authorities. Jordaens continued his activities as a designer of tapestries. One of the most prestigious commissions the artist received was for the decoration of the Oranjezaal at the Huis ten Bosch, near The Hague. From the time of Peter Paul Rubens’s death in 1640 until 1660, Jacob Jordaens was in great demand and he remained Antwerp’s leading figure painter until his death.

1 At any rate the two were used as a group in one still extant drawing Jordaens depicting St. Ives, Patron of Lawyers from circa 1640. See: M. Jaffé, Jacob Jordaens 1593 - 1678, ex. cat. (National Gallery of Canada, Ottowa) 1968, p. 366, ill.

 

Adriaen van der Werff

Adriaen van der Werff
Kralingen 1652 – 1722 Rotterdam
“Portrait of an Officer said to be The Duke of Schomberg”
Oil on canvas
48 x 39 cm
Signed

Adriaen van der Werff
Kralingen 1659 - 1722 Rotterdam


Portrait of An Officer Said to be The Duke of Schomberg


Oil on canvas: 48 x 39 cm
Signed and dated lower left: Adr n. v d Werff. Fec An o 1702

Exhibited:
The Hague, 1942, no. 32

Literature:
B. Gaehtgens, Adriaen van der Werff 1659 - 1722, Munich 1987, no. C17, p. 427

The present painting is a good and typical example of Van der Werff as a painter of portraits. Van der Werff started his career with painting small genre scenes, based on examples by his tutor Eglon van der Neer. In around 1680 he stopped producing genre paintings and turned to painting history pieces and portraiture. Most of Van der Werff’s portraits are painted on a small scale, such as the present, and in a refined manner. He would place his sitters, which he mostly represents to the knee, in a landscape, occasionally furnished with classical statues. As in the portrait here under consideration, his sitters usually lean on a stone balustrade.

Although Barbara Gaehtgens classified the painting as ‘doubtful’ in her monograph and catalogue raisonné on the artist, there is no reason to reject the painting. During a meeting with Mrs Gaehtgens recently (24 November 2005), after she had seen a good colour transparency, she declared that in her view, indeed, the painting is genuine.

Adriaen van der Werff was the son of a well-to-do miller. In spite of his father’s objections, he persisted in his wish to pursue an artistic career. His father finally allowed him to study for a while with the Rotterdam portrait painter Cornelis Picolet. He continued his education under the guidance of Eglon van der Neer, between circa 1671 and 1676. Van der Werff gradually endowed his mostly small-scaled and highly finished paintings with classicizing aesthetics. He treated a broad variety of subject matter, portraits and genre paintings but in the course of years increasingly focused on depicting biblical and mythological themes. In 1687 Van der Werff married Margaretha van Rees who was from a wealthy family. By that time he had become one of the most successful artists and was able to command excessive prices for his pictures. Through his wife’s guardian, Nicolaes Flinck, who owned an outstanding art collection, Van der Werff was brought in contact with numerous other leading collectors, namely Jan Six and Philips de Flines. In 1691 Van der Werff was dean of the Rotterdam guild of St. Luke and again in 1695. The Elector Palatine, Johann Wilhelm von der Pfalz, appointed him court painter in 1697. In 1703 Van der Werff was knighted by Johann Wilhelm. By the time of his death Van der Werff was regarded as Holland’s foremost painter, internationally admired and collected. Among his pupils are his younger brother Pieter, who in later years collaborated with him, Philip van Dyk and Bartholomeus Douven. Many more painters were influenced by his smooth, classicist style. Next to being a painter, Van der Werff was also an accomplished architect.

 

Eddy Schavemaker

Pieter de Bloot

Pieter de Bloot
1601 – Rotterdam – 1658
“The rat catcher”
Oil on panel
27 x 20,3 cm
Signed: P de Bloot

Pieter de Bloot
1601 - Rotterdam - 1658


The Rat Catcher


Oil on panel: 10 5/8 x 8 inches
         27 x 20.3 cm

Signed lower right: P De.Bloot


Provenance:
With Van Diemen & Co., The Hague
Constantinus L. Fliermans, Jr., Nijmegen
Maria F. K. Fliermans
By whom given to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in memory of Constantinus Lucas Fliermans, Jr.

Literature:
P. Wescher, Catalogue of Paintings, Los Angeles County Museum, 1954, vol. 2, no. 50
A Catalogue of Flemish, German, Dutch and English Paintings, Los Angeles County Museum, Los Angeles 1954, p. 47, no. 50 (as Cornelis Saftleven), ill.
S. Schaefer & P. Fusco, European Painting and Sculpture in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles 1987, p. 19, ill.

Pieter de Bloot’s father, also named Pieter, and his mother Anneken Jacobsdr were from Antwerp. In 1601 they married in Rotterdam and their son was born in the same year. It is unknown with whom Pieter was trained, but his lowlife genre pieces reflect the influence of Adriaen Brouwer. He had additional incomes from his activities as a dealer in real estate. De Bloot became a wealthy man especially after his third marriage in 1630 with the rich widow Maria Govertsdr Vogels. In 1646 he also participated in the ownership of a tile factory. His pictures are found with some frequency in contemporary inventories attesting to the high regard in which he was held. Other evidence of his esteem is the fact that he was mentioned in the ‘List of Painters’ compiled by the Amsterdam doctor Jan Sysmus around 1670. De Bloot is generally known for his genre scenes crowded with peasants in the tradition of Brouwer, but he also painted landscapes in the manner of Jan van Goyen and Pieter de Molijn and he produced some history pieces.

Gerbrandt van den Eeckhout

Gerbrandt van den Eeckhout
1621 - Amsterdam -1674
“Io, Hermes and Argus”
Oil on canvas
39,5 x 47,8
Signed and dated: G.v.Eeckhout fc. Ano 1672